The DeHavilland Blog

Sunday, March 05, 2006

An interesting business/education partnership model

Pasted verbatim (with permission) from Friday's News Brief from the National Alliance of State Science and Mathematics Coalitions:

NATIONAL ALLIANCE OF STATE SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS COALITIONS
News Brief #3481 Category: Business Role in Education
TITLE: “In Their Search for Skilled Workers, Big Employers Go to Summer Camp”

Major corporations are backing career-oriented summer camps, an investment they hope will bear a future return of skilled workers.

IBM, Texas Instruments and Exxon Mobil are funding a middle-school science and technology camp program that serves 500 kids in five cities. AT&T supports three science and math camps in Detroit and Chicago. Intel sponsors three science camps in Colorado and Oregon.

The employers hope to increase the number of American students training for careers in science and technology. The fields are particularly low on women, who, for example, account for just 14 percent of electrical engineering degree-holders.

Twenty women employees at Texas Instruments chipped in $5000 apiece to fund girls-only initiatives such as summer physics camps. “We want to make sure more girls understand the future opportunities in industries like ours,” said Melendy Lovett, a senior vice president at TI.

Initial results from the camp experiments are promising. More than a quarter of TI campers have gone on to take the AP physics exams. About 80 percent of middle-school participants in IBM camps say they intend to pursue a technology-related degree.

SOURCE: Wall Street Journal, 23 February 2006
WEBSITE:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB114065440403380706.html

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